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Does jealousy serve any purpose?

jealousy

2 thoughts on “Does jealousy serve any purpose?”

  1. Sneh Chakraburtty says:

    Jealousy ‘is a complex emotion that encompasses many different kinds of feelings ranging from fear of abandonment to rage and humiliation” psychologytoday.com. Jealousy by definition is jealous resentment against a rival, a person enjoying success or advantage, etc., or against another’s success or advantage itself. It happens to those who are afraid of another’s success or are angry about it.
    It is a mixed emotion of possessiveness, rage, suspicion, and humiliation which leaves one threatened
    Jealousy ‘is a complex emotion that encompasses many different kinds of feelings ranging from fear of abandonment to rage and humiliation” psychologytoday.com. Jealousy by definition is jealous resentment against a rival, a person enjoying success or advantage, etc., or against another’s success or advantage itself. It happens to those who are afraid of another’s success or are angry about it.
    It is a mixed emotion of possessiveness, rage, suspicion, and humiliation which leaves one threatened

  2. Sneh Chakraburtty says:

    The Mind Matters
    Human mind has amazing powers but also trends towards immense suffering through acquisitiveness and covetousness. Many of us do not realize this. Our ancient literature and old epics (Puranas) illustrate the power of mind with beautiful stories.
    Because every person creates some kind of frequency vibration, some people are pleasure to be with. They seem to have a certain ‘right’ dynamic energy conducive of lively relationships that they share with others. Then there are those who are negative and depressed; they seem to draw energy out of others.
    Is it in our nature to be altruistic, or evil, to make art, use tools, or create language? Is it in our nature to think in any particular way? If it is a “No!” The only thing humans are hardwired for is the instinct to adapt to a variety of environmental for purposes of freedom.
    Various cultures callow us to think how other culture assist our cognitive flexibility. Because culture and individual psychology operate symbiotically, the concept of the cultural ‘self’ joins our experiences through diverse perceptions, sporadic memories, grouping of personal values, understanding them and their utility in social roles and social norms. They together shape our biological instinct.
    The result is fascinating portrait of the “dark matter of the mind,” one that shows that our greatest evolutionary adaptation is adaptability..The reason for this is that there is a power contained in thought. It is subtle, yet it does exist and is extremely powerful. Every thought has weight, shape, size, form, colour, quality, and power. An experienced yogi can see this directly with his inner eye. It is possible to give a powerful useful thought to someone and take it back.” – says Swami Vishnu Devananda.
    Many know we are what we eat; we are also what we think. Lord Krishna in Bhagavad Gita says,’’Let a man lift himself by himself: let him not degrade himself: for the self alone is the friend of the self and self alone is the enemy of the self”
    Man can elevate himself simply by always thinking something good – this is mental yagna.

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